Thursday, December 06, 2007

Adjustable rate mortages frozen at their current rate

Newsflash:

December 6, 2007: In an effort to provide some stability to the mortgage market, while helping homeowner’s – as many as 2 million sub-prime ARM loans made at the start of 2005, through July 30, 2007, whose interest rates are scheduled to jump to higher rates between January 1, 2008 through July 31, 2010 will be locked in at their current rate.

Being called a ‘teaser freezer’ – the rate freeze is aimed at owner-occupied homes whose monthly mortgage payments may rise as much as 30% if adjusted to current rates. Its another effort to quash the “avalanche” of foreclosures that some in the industry are predicting. For more information visit www.federalreserve.gov or www.teamresults21.com.

Monday, June 11, 2007

A fun new toy.

I just found the coolest thing. The Meade My Sky Personal Video Planetarium! Its like have a personal astronomer. It can identify 30,000
celestial objects with point-and-shoot ease. So easy and fun!

Its got an easy menu, full color LCD screen and if you have a Meade Computerized telescope, it can even control that. Fun for the whole family, this thing is a must have for any hobbyist. I think I'll get two, one for me and one for my dad! (father's day is coming up soon.)

If you order from Opticsplanet you can get free UPS shipping! (you have to spend more than $29.95)

click here
skyscout to see everything you get and menu demos.

meade my sky

Tuesday, May 15, 2007

relief for defaulting borrowers?

There may be some relief coming for homeowner’s who face foreclosure action by their lender. Washington Mutual, Bank of America, Citigroup, Merrill Lynch, and Wells Fargo, received letters asking for a six month moratorium on Foreclosures and instead urging these major lenders in the California market to focus on finding ways to keep borrowers from loosing their homes.

Many thousands of borrowers in California are at risk of default because they took on risky loans, and could loose their homes. Consumer groups, legal aid groups, housing services, at least place some blame on the lenders themselves because of loose underwriting which pushed some borrowers into loans they couldn’t afford.

The Los Angeles Times quoted the associate director of California Reinvestment Coalition as saying “We are asking the largest lenders in the state to take leadership so that families can keep their homes and California’s economy won’t suffer”.

(edit)
as of December 6, 2007 one effort to assist homeowners has been put into place - visit the December 6 posting for details.

Friday, April 13, 2007

everything you ever wanted to know about real estate but were afraid to ask: Reverse Mortgage

A reverse mortgage is a way to borrow money against the equity in your home to provide you with tax-free income. You can receive funds in any number of ways including:

Lump sum
Regular monthly payments for as long as you live (or reside in your home)
Monthly payments with a pre-determined cut off date
A line of credit to draw on when you need it
or a Combination of these

A reverse mortgage can enable you to enjoy retirement more, provide some financial cushioning for future emergencies or major expenses, while, allowing you to remain in your home and keep title to it. Being more complicated than a conventional mortgage, a reverse mortgage carries some pros & cons and has different qualifying requirements for borrowers. The most notable requirement is that the youngest borrower must be at least 62 years old when the loan closes.

Some other requirements are that the home must be your primary residents and remain so during the term of the loan, and that existing loans, or mortgages be paid off prior to closing on the Reverse Mortgage. (reverse mortgage funds can be used for this according to cash advance rules).

If you choose to, you can even pay off a reverse mortgage early by refinancing out, or just settling up with the lender. If you should pass away before the loan is paid, your heirs can choose to pay off the loan or sell the property, any proceeds above the loan amount of your home goes to your heirs.

applying for a reverse mortgage is easy, and you can start online. The National Reverse Lenders Association website is a good starting point to gather information from lenders. The URL is http://www.reversemortgage.org/ .

Team Results also has a 12 page pamphlet available that covers in detail all aspects of reverse mortgages. We'll gladly mail a copy or e-mail an electronic version at your request. Send requests to TeamResults@Century21.com. Be sure to include your preferred delivery method.



© 2007, John Wall, all rights reserved.

Monday, April 02, 2007

drug and alcohol treatment

Paid Post: Please read our disclosure.

***

“If you know someone addicted to alcohol and any other drug getting informed and involved maybe that persons only hope of a positive outcome of the addiction. Addiction usually ends in one of three ways treatment, jail, or death.” Stone Hawk Website

Located in Battle Creek Michigan (just east of Chicago), Stone Hawk heals addicts through its education and cleansing approach to drug and alcohol treatment. The program works to achieve permanent drug free living for its participants, with a success rate near 80%. The successful results of the program can be attributed to its healing and education of patients. Stone Hawk’s life skills and after treatment programs add an additional component that yield results.

alcoholism treatment

Sunday, April 01, 2007

Real Estate & the Economy

Business Week televised a couple of good items about the real estate industry as a whole yesterday. Their video can be seen here: http://feedroom.businessweek.com/index.jsp?fr_story=1164424c0c16afd06ab22f7edc11e1b8de2f5ab5 I've pulled information from other current videos as well.

Some of the bullet points I thought were important are:

Buyers still have an edge in real estate.
Seller's are becoming more flexible and responsive to buyers' terms. It was specifically pointed out that buyer's who low-balling the selling price won't produce the desired result and indicated that 10% below asking was a reasonable price reduction to request.

Seller's can increase their returns by upgrading with environmentally friendly improvements. Shown by the trend in eco-friendly home buyers.
Sellers were directed to post at least 6 high-quality photos (recommended by Realtor.com) because 80% of home buyer's check out listings online before touring in person.

Buyer's too have some work to do like; giving a boost to their credit score, and finding the best deal (budget friendly) on a mortgage.

Mike Mandel, Business Week Economist, talked about the economy as a whole & the real estate market's effect on it. He says there are factors other than the mortgage market that consumers should be keeping an eye on.
Mike pointed out that 30 year fixed rates are actually lower than they were a year ago and that borrower's who have an adjustable rate mortgage, and decent credit will have little trouble re-financing into a fixed rate and will be "sitting pretty".

As a whole the mortgage market is doing just fine, though the sub-prime market is in a bit of trouble. The market will no doubt affect the economy but won't cause a recession according to Mandel. One of the more important aspects to watch closely is business investment which he says have slowed and is at very low levels.

Also the increase in foreclosure activity was localized to areas that didn't have strong real estate markets in the first place.

Monday, March 26, 2007

Home Loans and Homework

When shopping for a home loan, it is important to choose reliable sources that offer reasonable rates, and that don't make claims that seem far fetched.

I like Mortgage Lenders that allow you to research your options before signing up for anything. The internet is an excellent resource for doing just that. Sites that have posted current rates and terms upfront are best. By doing a little homework ahead of time, you will be better able to make the right choices for you and your personal financial situation. In the end, it all makes for a smoother transaction.

Mortgage Lenders , is a lender site that we tried and really liked. The information is current and accurate and the website is easy to navigate. (essential because our attention span is getting shorter)

Saturday, March 24, 2007

Here's To Real Estate Blogs

The Los Angeles Times today printed an interesting piece on real estate blogs. In it Brad Inman (Inman News) was quoted as saying, “some of the best reporting this year has been from the blogs.”

I guess that’s kudos for all of us here. My favorite quote in the article was from a reader of the Housing Bubble Casualty Blog who said, “you were one of the influences that saved me from buying in Los Angeles”. It made me wonder where that person is renting now.

According to Adam Rappoport, San Deigo Broker, “bloggers see the same statistics we all see, but they interpret them differently.”

Read the article for yourself www.latimes.com, and let me hear your view. Personally, and this has been said many times before; Real estate is an ever changing business with ups and downs like all others. Its also a very local marketplace. In my area alone, there are neighborhoods within blocks of each other that are enjoying quick sales with offers at or near asking, and others that are holding inventory 3 or four months old.

I guess my answer to the question “is it a good time to buy?” is: That depends on your point of view. If you are looking for a quick way to make money with real estate, it might not be a good time. If you are looking for a home to raise a family, and a place to call your own – then it’s a great time. As far as bubble casualty blogs and the like, these people are the ones who didn’t buy when they could and now are regretting it, while justifying their stalling on unforeseen market conditions. Those are the people who resign themselves to renting forever. As a landlord myself, I love those people – because they pay all my bills for me and If I want to give myself a raise… Up goes the rent.

The people who actually are experiencing a bubble are those who never should have bought in the first place. They are the folks who sat in front of a loan officer who offered a great deal on a loan they could barely afford, and took the deal. Of course, without realizing that they’d end up owing more than they thought, and wouldn’t be able to make the payments 5 years down the line. That truly is just shoddy work on behalf of the mortgage industry, and a spotlight on the fraud that takes place in it.

Advice for buyers; seek out a mortgage planner – who will lay it all out and show you how much your investment really is. And, if you have to lie about your income or debts to get a better deal, don’t. (aside from being illegal, you’ll only end up with a home you can’t afford.)

Thursday, March 15, 2007

Plan your summer vacation the right way

Planning your summer vacation? Try hotelreservations.com. This website is well planned and laid out. Navigating it is easy and the thing I liked best was you can search for rates and find deals without having to register. Something I find really annoying.

The deals online are fantastic. I found car rental in Long Beach for as little at $15 per day. Of course that was for an economy sized car but you can book anything you want. I found sedans and SUVs and even sports & near-luxury cars.

The days of visiting your local travel agent to plan your vacation are over. Most having been out of business for a while now. Hotel Reservations gives you the ability to be your own travel agent. Finding the right deals, and travel options for you and your family.

Online you can even plan and book more complicated trips than your family reunion up north. It easy to find packages for popular travel destinations or create your own. The savings on this site make it possible to create your own package, Airfare, hotel or vacation rental property, rental car and more all at once from your couch.

If you are like me though and sometimes like to actually speak with someone about your travel plans (or just verify that your reservations are in place) you can call 800- 447-4136 for assistance. With more than 70,000 properties worldwide, including Hotels, Bed & Breakfasts. Condominiums, and resorts, booking the perfect trip is effortless online. According to the website reservations are backed by their Price Guarantee so you can rest assured you’re getting the best deal.


Hotel Reservations




If you haven’t already, give it a try and book your next vacation online at Hotel Reservations.com. You’ll find it rewarding and fun to do-it-yourself.
If you need help or have more questions, the FAQ page offers solutions to the most important questions such as: What happens when I make a reservation?, I don’t have long to wait for a conformation, what should I do?, and the all important – How do I cancel a reservation?.


Have you thought about upgrading your lighting lately?

It might be a good idea because it can affect the desirability of your home when trying to sell and create a comforting atmosphere while you are living in it. Lighting has many purposes, most of us use task lighting for reading in the den, cooking in the kitchen, and mood lighting for romantic moments in the bedroom.

How your home is lit, definitely has an effect on our moods and perceptions of the things we see. Harsh lighting causes a withdrawal of your visual senses and generally isn’t pleasing aesthetically. While a toned down, soft lit room will help us unwind and relax and the end of the day, it might not help much while trying to prepare dinner if we can’t see too well in the kitchen.

Finding a balance between light levels and types of lighting in each room of your home can be daunting to say the least. Keeping in mind what purpose our lighting design serves helps to find just the right balance. Having a good selection of lighting fixtures helps even more. We’d invite you to check out Home Lighting Fixtures an, Arizona based lighting store that features all the latest trends in indoor and outdoor lighting, as well as a plethora of educational documents to help with design, & planning your lighting projects.

This site has everything you need to create the perfect atmosphere, making your home more inviting, and comfortable for your family & friends. Make sure you check out the outdoor lighting as well. We all know that a nicely landscaped home with just the right lighting will improve curb appeal, often the first thing people see when looking to buy a home.

Remember also, to try to stay true to your home’s architectural style. You wont want Craftsman fixtures all over a Tudor house. That’s another area I’ve found shoppremier.com useful is available of architecturally matched collections.
So go out and spruce up your home. Lighting is an inexpensive way of completely changing the look and feel of your home and if done well, can be a personal benefit also.

http://www.shoppremier.com/lighting_design.php

Tuesday, March 13, 2007

The Five Factors of Credit Scoring

There are five factors that impact consumer credit scores. They are listed here in order of importance:

  • Payment History has a 35% impact. Paying debt on time and in full has a positive impact and late payments, judgements and charge-offs have a negative impact.
  • Outstanding Credit Balances have a 30% impact. Debt ratio of outstanding balance to available credit is important. Keeping that below 50% is wise and below 30% even wiser. It is never a good idea to close an account; the debt ratio will go up and the number of seasoned lines will decrease. Pay outstanding debt down as close to zero as possible and evenly redistribute the remaining balance among the open lines. The increased interest incurred by moving a balance form a 0% card to a 23% card will be minimal relative to what the increased mortgage debt might be with a low credit score. Hitting the maximums of available credit can be very negative. It may be worth calling and asking the credit company to increase your available credit to lower the debt ratio, provided they can do that without a hard credit inquiry.
  • Credit History has a 15% impact. The length of time a particular credit line has been opened is important. A seasoned borrower is stronger.
  • Type of Credit has a 10% impact. A mix of auto loans, credit cards and mortgages is positive, rather than a concentration in credit cards only.
  • Inquiries have a 10% impact. Hard inquiries for credit will negatively impact the score. Auto and mortgage inquiries receive a special treatment and 20 inquiries can be made in a 14-day period for auto or mortgage and will be treated as only 1 inquiry. The maximum number of inquiries that will reduce the score is 10. Any inquires beyond that [11+] in a six-month period will have no further impact on the borrower. Each hard inquiry can cost 2-50 points on a credit score.

You Credit Score

A good credit score can mean the difference between a low mortgage rate with conventional financing and a restrictive, higher-rate loan. There are some simple but very important steps you can take to clean up your credit.

1. Look for any past due balances on the credit report and bring them current.

2. Reduce all outstanding debt to as close to a zero balance as possible. If unable to pay all debt down, evenly distribute any remaining debt among open credit cards, or consider opening a new line and transferring some of the balances. Try to keep balances below 50% of available credit; below 30% would be even better. Do not close existing accounts.

3. If married, keep separate credit cards. This provides flexibility in transferring some or all of the balances to one spouse to increase the credit score of the other. This provides the possibility of one spouse becoming the sole borrower and it does not change the ownership of the home.

4. Request an increase in available lines on cards to reduce debt ratio, but only if your credit card company can that without a hard credit inquiry.

5. Pay off past dues and charge-offs within the last two years. Beyond two years, it will have no impact on your score if wiped out. In fact, the act of paying it off can actually take your score down temporarily.

6. Request that creditors and credit bureaus delete any outstanding debt that is incorrectly charged to you or has yet to be cleared. They have an obligation to react within 30 days. If you choose to pay off an outstanding debt (less than two years old) mark the back of the check "accepting this check is evidence that the transaction is complete and this charge will be deleted from my credit." You may be able to use the cancelled check if the outstanding debt is not removed.



Agent Site :

Sunday, March 11, 2007

Its Tax Season Again

Its Tax Season Again.

This year Tuesday, April 17, is the deadline to file your federal tax returns. And this is a good time to remind our friends to double check your returns before sending them off whether electronically or the old fashioned paper method.

The IRS has been touting via public relations officials with the agency, its increased audit efforts. On the radio this morning a spokesman for the IRS stated that the agency has upped its audit efforts and is trying to close the gap on non-payers. He also reminded listeners that not filing a return in many ways is more serious than not being able to pay your taxes, or willfully filing incorrect information. That is because the fines and penalties for not filing, are higher than other tax infractions.

Having been audited myself several times, I know it’s a pain in the butt and I would not wish the experience on anyone. In order to avoid being an audit victim, and I say that with all sincerity, make sure to keep your records organized and available. Remember that there is no statute of limitations for the IRS to come after you for failing to file. Here are a few questions and answers you’ll find useful.

Q: WHO NEEDS TO FILE?

A: Anyone who is employed, receiving earnings more than $8,450 in this tax year, and anyone who is self-employed or independent contractor, earning ‘net’ (after expenses) income over $400. (yes four hundred).

Q: WILL YOU HOLD MY HAND WHILE I AM BEING AUDITED?

A: Yes, I Will.

Q: WHERE CAN I GET GOOD TAX ADVICE?

A: I think the IRS itself is a good source of information. The website has every single form and publication available for download, or you can request that they be mailed to you. I would urge you to request your forms now, because, they won’t get to you in time to do any good if you wait much longer. The IRS website is http://www.irs.gov.

If you don’t have internet access, please e-mail me at john.wall1@century21.com and let me know how you are reading this blog.

Q: WHEN YOU WERE AUDITED, DID YOU CRY?

A: Only once.

Q: WHAT MAKES YOU SUCH AN EXPERT ON TAXES?

A: I am not! You should seek the advice of a qualified tax professional, and I would suggest you find someone who can represent you during an audit.

Some things I would like to remind you of is the long distance phone tax credit available this year. Every individual who has paid for long distance phone service is likely to qualify for this credit. You must however request it on your tax form (any of the 1040 forms) or if you don’t need to file a return, but want to receive your credit, you can file form 1040EZT. The EZT version of the 1040 is used only to request the credit.

Also, make sure you look at other available credits like the EIC or Earned Income Credit. While we are at it, I would like to mention that TAX CREDITS are better for most filers because a CREDIT means REFUND! When a tax credit is available to you, it means the IRS is holding money just for you. The caveat is that you must ask for it in order to receive it. Whereas, a deduction is a dollar amount that reduces your taxable income and possibly your tax liability (the amount you owe the IRS).

Remember a self employed person earning more than $400 must file a return? In theory if you earned $100,000 but had $99,600 in expenses that are deductable on your return, you would meet the qualifier for not having to file a federal tax return. (Don’t take my word on that – this is theoretical)

Some other things to remember are if you file zero income tax returns because you subscribe to certain beliefs such as ‘taxes are illegal’, you might end up in jail. The courts have tried many cases like these and the filer always looses. When the IRS comes after you, it will most likely cost you more than you would ever pay just filing an honest return.

For our home sellers and buyers, remember to get your 1031 and IRC 121 figures together now because in my personal experience, these transactions are audited more frequently (the IRS officially disputes this). If you are audited, don’t panic – Until you are called into an IRS field office. In which case, you shouldn’t go alone. Bring along your CPA, Tax Advisor, or advocate.

Having said that, most tax audits are ‘correspondence audits’ which are very painless, and easy to complete. They’re scary for tax payers because the notice comes in ‘official IRS – you’re about to be horse whipped stationary’. But really, this type of audit basically says, “Hi – This is the government. We have a question about line 22 of your tax return. Would you mind clarifying it please?” See, that’s not so bad! Just answer their questions and all will be okay.

A final thought; tax auditors are not the brutal, meanies that they are portrayed as in comedy sketches. In fact, I’ve never met one that wasn’t pleasant, friendly, and helpful except for one and he’s a jerk.

Go Download Publication 17 for more information on taxes – and remember that taxes are the cost of free society.



Agent Page ||Active Rain Blog ||E-mail

Monday, March 05, 2007

6 simple rules for selecting a contractor.

Home Improvement & Repairs


Home improvements and repairs can cost thousands of dollars and are subject to frequent complaints. These suggestions may help limit unnecessary expense.
Get recommendations and references. Talk to family, friends and others who have used the contractor for similar work.
Get at least three written estimates. Insist that the contractor visit your home to evaluate what needs to be done. Are all 3 estimates based on the same work? Make meaningful comparisons.
Check the contractor’s complaint record. Check with state and local consumer protection agencies.
Make sure your contractor meets licensing and registration requirements. Again, your local or state consumer protection agency can help identify requirements and tell you if your contractor is compliant.
Check with the building inspection department to determine permit and inspection requirements. If the contractor asks YOU to obtain any permits BEWARE. This may be a sign that your contractor is not properly licensed.Finally, DON’T MAKE A FINAL PAYMENT OR SIGN A FINAL RELEASE UNTIL YOUR ARE SATISFIED WITH THE WORK. Have all subcontractors and suppliers been paid? Some states including California, allow suppliers and sub-contractors to put a LIEN against your home if the contractor has failed to pay them.

Week in review

YOU KNOW WHO IS LOOKING FOR STOCKS? NOBODY! Last week's volatility in the stock market stabbed at the hearts of both the Stock and Bond markets, with home loan rates swinging higher and lower throughout the course of the week. Economic news releases took a backseat to the massive movements in Stocks. Amazingly, when all the smoke cleared, home loan rates were unchanged to slightly improved for the week overall.
What happened? First, remember that the Stock and Bond markets compete for the same investment dollar. This means that when Stocks are worsening and investors are selling off their holdings, some of that money gets moved over into the Bond market, which helps home loan rates improve. And vice versa, when Stocks move higher and investors are buying into the Stock market, some of that money comes back out of Bonds, which causes home loan rates to worsen.
Last week's volatility began with the Chinese Stock market plunging, setting off a string of worldwide stock selling. Our own Stock market was ripe for a reversal lower, and money flowed out of Stocks and into Bonds, helping home loan rates improve. The next day, Stocks began to rebound, moving money back out of Bonds and causing home loan rates to worsen. But the "see-saw" action continued for the balance of the week - and may not be done yet, causing high amounts of volatility in Stocks and Bonds - and therefore, home loan rates.

Compiled by TeamResults Affiliates as a service to our clients. Always seek advice from your own experts. E-mail TeamResults@Century21.com with questions, comments or concerns.






Saturday, March 03, 2007

The Top 10 Reasons, you haven't called

Why haven't you called?


#10. You enjoy calling agent after agent playing the old "Let's Swap Names" game.

#9. You think I'm going to bite.

#8. You just came from one of those "Real Estate Financial Seminars" and the guru told you that you needed to listen to all his tapes before you called anybody.

#7. You were going to but you forgot.

#6. You own a gas station so you can afford to pump tank after tank of unleaded in your car running around looking at houses that don't interest you.

#5. Your first aunt's second cousin's sister Marlene has a Real Estate license.

#4. Someone lied to you and told you we would charge you a commission.

#3. You want to pay too much for a house.

#2. Your dog ate your cell phone

#1. You didn't know we would be tickled pink to give you all the information you want (including the addresses) of all the properties you might be interested in.

No kidding, give us a call.
We'll give you all the information you need on any property listed in the area.
FREE. NO HASSLES. NO KIDDING.

pricing your home

Why is it that some homes sit on the market for a year while others sell like hot cakes? Frustrated sellers will blame a bad market, while a good real estate professional will tell you that many times, a slow sale is often attributed to the listing price.
If a home is overpriced, buyers will stay away. But, if the price is competitive with similar homes in the area and “shows” better than the competition, it will have a better chance of being sold quickly.
The secret is perfecting a technique that’s as American as apple pie: comparative shopping.
Although comparing houses with different styles, square-footages and locations is challenging, real estate professionals still feel it’s one of the best methods to use when determining a home’s market value.
A responsible real estate agent will effectively evaluate a home’s worth through a process known as Competitive Marketing Analysis (CMA). Taking a look at assets, such as a swimming pool, bigger than normal living spaces, a fantastic view, adjacent city parks and other attractions, the agent will begin to compare your home with similar properties, called “comparables,” that have sold in the area within the last six months. Typically, the agent is able to recommend a realistic price range that will ensure you top dollar and a reasonably
However, factors such as the amount of time needed to sell your home can alter the agent’s price recommendation dramatically.
Typically, people should check with real estate agents in the community to determine the typical duration that listings are on the market. Sales associates will explain that the marketing “norms” vary with prices and properties. Based on this criteria, the agent feels confident that he or she will be able to sell it for a price that both you and the buyer will be happy with. However, if you’re under time constraints because of unexpected job changes or moving agreements you’ve made on another property, this will narrow your chances of selling the home for top dollar in the market.
Assuming you have sufficient time to market the home, here are a few small steps you and your agent can take to finding the right price for your property.
The best comparisons can be made with similar homes that have been sold within the last 45 days as opposed to the standard six months. Any longer and other factors, such as the economy, could cloud your view of how much your home is really worth.
Another good benchmark is to review the selling prices of homes that have just been sold and are pending closes. Most MLS services provide information on deals pending that most real estate agents should be able to shore with you.
A good rule of thumb before setting a price is to make 20 comparisons of comparable properties within a one-mile radius of your house. Once completed you can feel comfortable that the price you’ve picked is a good gauge of the home’s worth and won’t discourage qualified buyers.
Being open and honest about what you see as the home’s greatest strengths and biggest weaknesses will also help an agent get a better feel for how to best evaluate (or assess) and market your home. Think of your home as if you were the buyer. If your home is listed at the right price, you’re well on your way to a speedy and fruitful sale.
***
John Wall is a sales associate with Century 21 Results, and serves all communities in Long Beach and surrounding cities. He can be contacted via e-mail at teamresults@century21.com or phone at 562-531-7000.

Friday, March 02, 2007

Easing into Homeownership

There’s no question about it: Buying a first home is a big financial commitment. In most cases, a home is the largest single purchase an individual or family will make in a lifetime. However, because of the tax advantages afforded to homeowners, buying a home also can be one of the best financial decisions you’ll ever make.
Problem is, many would-be homeowners remain renters simply because they mistakenly believe mortgage lenders require that buyers come up with 20 percent of the purchase price as a down payment. While it’s true lenders feel it’s less risky to work with buyers who are able to bring a substantial down payment to the table, the standard 20 percent requirement is fast becoming a relic of the past. In recent years, lenders have become more flexible in working with first-time homebuyers by creating a variety of special programs that require only a small down payment. These programs, combined with the most favorable interest rates in two decades, have encouraged growing numbers of renters to consider the tremendous benefits of home ownership.
While the list of programs offered by individual lenders is too extensive to mention in detail, here are some common programs you are likely to come across as you work with your real estate agent to purchase your first home:
Federal Housing Administration (FHA): FHS mortgages allow homebuyers to purchase a home with as little as a 5 percent down payment, and to finance all non-recurring closing costs. The current maximum loan amount in most urban markets is $151,725. In addition, borrowers are allowed to use up to 41 percent of their gross income toward paying mortgage debt – well above the ratio allowed under most private programs.
Department of Veterans Affairs (VA): VA mortgages allow veteran or active service personnel purchase home with no down payment, up to the current maximum price of $184.000. However, there is no purchase price limitation for buyers able to make a down payment. Like the FHA program, VA borrowers can put up to 41 percent of gross income toward their mortgage debt.
Mortgage Revenue Bonds and Mortgage Credit Certificates: Mortgages funded with these instruments typically require a minimum of 5 percent down and have interest rates that are 1.5 to 2 percentage points below conventional 30-year fixed rates. These types of loans, offered by state and local housing agencies, are available only to first-time homebuyers. There generally are income and purchase price caps that vary, depending on where you plan to buy.
Private Mortgage Insurance: Most major lenders offer privately insured mortgages, which generally require a 10 percent down payment (although some lenders offer loans with a 5 percent down payment to buyers with exceptional credit). These loans typically are not limited by maximum loan amount or purchase price limitation.
Community Homebuyer Program: Through their networks of mortgage lenders, the Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac) offer Community Homebuyer Program loans. These programs require a 5 percent down payment, 3 percent of which may be a gift. To further help buyers qualify, applicants may use 38 percent of their gross income. Currently, the maximum loan amount available through these programs is $203,150.
Clearly, there are a lot of options for first-time homebuyers. While lenders will be more than happy to share information about their own programs, you can save yourself a good deal of time by first selecting a professional real estate agent who is experienced in working with first-time buyers in the areas where you plan to buy. As agent who focuses on first-time buyers will know from experience which lenders in your area offer a low down payment program that will meet your unique needs.
Today, taking the first step toward owning your own home is easier than before. Your real estate agent is your best resource for finding innovative ways to help you come up with a down payment and qualify for financing. There’s certainly no need to wait until you’ve saved a 20 percent down payment!

For more information on low down mortgages or other real estate information, please e-mail teamresults@century21.com, or call 562-433-1914.

Tenants in Common Ownership

Priced out of the real estate market? You’re not alone. Many hard working people just like you, can’t afford a median priced home by themselves either.

Don’t fret, there may still be a way. If you haven’t already considered doing so, think about buying with a trusted friend, colleague, or family member.

If you don’t, you may very well be resigning yourself to renting forever. Even though there is a possibility of conflict, you can easily limit these by crafting a well detailed contract defining each party’s roles and responsibilities.

When choosing your house partner remember, that you are probably making the largest purchase of your life and most likely taking yourself and your partner into debt for the next 30 years or more. So it makes sense that if your partner is already under a high debt load, your relationship may easily become strained. A clear credit record should be a priority when choosing any investment partner.

Of course its best if each of you has a credit score of 700 or more. If that’s not the case, you’re not out of luck yet. Just be aware that you’ll end up paying a little higher interest rate on your home-loan.

If scores are a bit on the middle to low end, it may be best to delay shopping for a new home for a little while, allowing time to pay down credit card debt, while paying bills on time. This should raise your score enough to score a more palatable loan.

Consulting an attorney regarding your partnership would be a very good idea too. You’ll need to begin make decisions about how to hold title to the house. This typically will be Tenants-in-common, where each of you owns a certain percentage of the property, usually 50%. Another option might be Joint Tenancy with right of survivorship. It is imperative that you each do some estate planning also. You’ll need to decide what will happen to the property if one or both of you should die. Depending on how you choose to hold title, one owner may sell his or her share of the property without your consent or knowledge. Also, if a family member inherits a portion of the property by will, you might end up co-owning with someone you wouldn’t otherwise choose.

A written agreement spelling out the terms of your co-habitation is immensely important for your own sake and peace of mind, also to establish procedures in case of a dispute or planned conversion of the property. It doesn’t always happen that both investors will live in the property, but since most people’s decision to buy a home is based on a roof over their head, it usually works out that way. If one of you is looking strictly for an investment vehicle, an agreement to rent, lease, or provide some other consideration for a partner’s share can compensate for not moving in.

In your written agreement, You’ll want to make sure you cover;

Expectations of each party
Terms of sale should either of you decide to sell
How each of you will contribute to the mortgage payment
Any other occupants, relatives, roommates, loved ones, etc.
Who will be responsible for maintaining various aspects of the property.


Most of all, make sure each of you can guarantee that you’ll be able to pay your share of expenses. Financial Guru, Suze Orman, recently suggested creating a joint checking account and for all housing costs and, setting up direct deposit so your share will always be in the account every month. At least once a month, sit down together on a set day, and pay the bills. Make sure each of you has ample emergency cash on hand (at least 3 months each) to handle any unexpected expenses.

Figure out ahead of time, how you’ll end the relationship. You know it will happen eventually, so why not spell it out, so there are no surprises. Plan for every aspect of your split. Will you buy out your partner, or vice versa? Will you sell and split the proceeds? These things should be in a written contract to avoid problems or misunderstandings.

If you plan ahead, choose your partner wisely, and follow some simple rules, you’ll end up a homeowner, build your wealth, and live happily-ever-after (probably).

Thursday, March 01, 2007

MOVING ON: POWERFUL TIPS FOR SELLING YOUR HOME

Maybe you're moving to a larger home to accommodate a growing family, relocating for a new career opportunity, or purchasing a townhouse for retirement. Whatever the reason for the move, you'll need to take the necessary steps to sell your home for the best possible price, within a reasonable amount of time. Where do you begin?

If you're like most people, you'll start by seeking assistance from a professional. A local real estate sales associate, who knows your neighborhood, can help you determine a fair market price. The sales associate should also recommend the extent to which you should make repairs or improvements to your house.

In order to select a real estate professional who's right for you, ask family, friends and neighbors for referrals. Attend open houses and interview several sales associates to find out how professional or experienced they may be. Get a written outline of how they plan to market your property and the services they will offer you.

Once you've identified a qualified professional, the rest is chemistry. Is the sales associate someone with whom you would like to work closely? Do you feel comfortable with the sales associate as your partner, working with you to give you advice and acting as your representative? Does he or she practice a consultative selling approach, focusing on the long-term client relationship and on the importance of exceeding client needs and expectations or is he or she caught up in the proverbial 'hard sell?'

The brokerage firm that your agent is associated with is also important. Research the firm's success rate and commitment to quality service. Does it survey existing clients in order to ensure customer satisfaction? What are the results of those surveys? How in tune are they with consumer needs? Do they offer guidance with mortgages or any discounts for other home related or moving services?

Determining your home's fair market value is one of the most important decisions you'll make during the home-selling/buying process. Your sales associate can help you set a fair price based on local market conditions. For instance, she or he will provide sale prices and other statistics of homes similar to yours that have recently been sold. Prospective buyers will be comparing your home to others on the market. Therefore, setting a comprehensive price can determine if your property will or will not sell.

For the first offer made, it's rare that the prospective buyer matches the asking price. If the offer is reasonably close to the asking price, carefully consider the offer before you consider turning it down. Curiously, it's the first offer that can often be the best offer. If the first offer is unacceptable to you, it may in your best interest to have your sales associate respond with a counter offer. Whenever considering an offer, ask yourself if you would purchase the property for the amount being offered. Always be willing to negotiate, especially if the prospective buyer is pre-qualified for a mortgage.

Once you decide what terms are acceptable, let your sales associate negotiate with the prospective buyer to work out the best agreement for you. You'll need to be patient while the buyer arranges financing and as the real estate company compiles and prepares pertinent data.
Careful planning and sound advice from a real estate professional can make selling your home a very satisfying experience. For further information, please contact, John Wall, Century 21 Results, (562) 531-7000, or e-mail john.wall1@century21.com

Starting your search on the internet

A lot has been said about home buyers searching the internet for their next house. In March 2005, we were talking about it. [see March, 2005 post here]

More and more people are using the internet as a launchpad for their home search and we support that. Its important to note however that homes that are listed on the internet are frequently old listings. The status of each property is not always (rarely) posted online so, if there is already an open escrow - searchers end up with false hope.

My advice is to use the internet as a tool in addition to traditional homesearch methods. Its our experience is that websites are best used to elimate possible homes, not find them. Realtors are not photographers or talented writers; the descriptions posted on a listing often fail to tell the whole story and important information might be excluded that a buyer would have strong views on. Photos of properties aren't always the best. Sure, you can see what a house looks like and those 2 big trees in the front yard - but do they show the sedan sized hole in the living room wall?

If you want a 2 story house and you're looking at photos of one story homes, you know that you wont be interested in them and can eliminate those properties from your tour list. When you find a photo of your dream home, call your Realtor and find out if its still available and when you can see it. You'll gain more from using the internet as an addition to your home searching tool kit rather than your sole source of possible houses.

A fantastic use of the internet and something we recomend all clients do is educating yourself about neighborhoods, businesses, demographics, histories, etc in the areas you are looking at moving to. There are thousands of websites that will tell you where the best schools are, quiet parks, shopping centers, and more. You can also find out who your possible neighbors will be. If you're looking for a small town feeling - that dream home you found probably wont suit you if its in an urban city with half a million people.

Remeber, the internet is good - use it to the best of its abilities; but don't rely on all that you find. Trust your agent & if you find something your agent hasn't seen - let them know... They have AOL too.

HOW TO SPOT A GOOD BUY

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, particularly when it comes to buying a home. Features that attract one home-buyer may repel another.
However, the one feature of interest to every home-buyer is price. Getting the most home for your money is paramount. The real problem is figuring out whether that fixer-upper on one street is a better buy than the home in next-to-new condition two blocks away. That’s why knowing what to look for before you buy can save you time, energy and money down the line.
The first step is figuring out what kind of house you need. A good buy is only a good buy if it meets your current and future living requirements. Before shopping for a home, decide how much space you and your family require. How many bedrooms, bathrooms? Is a family room necessary? Do you need a layout that will accommodate a lot of entertaining? Do you prefer a spacious or compact work space in the kitchen? If you have small children, can the house easily be childproofed?
Evaluate the front and back yards. Is there enough space to accommodate your children? Do you want a park-like or garden setting? Do you enjoy yard work and gardening, or do you want a low-maintenance yard? Take into consideration the cost of extensive landscaping and upkeep.
Next, determine how much work is required to make the house you are considering livable. Make an honest assessment of your fix-it abilities. How much work are you willing to do or pay someone else to do? Do you have basic decorating, carpentry and plumbing skills? If you plan to learn as you go, make sure you have accurately determined what you are getting into. Ask an experienced friend, family member or your real estate agent for their opinion, and be sure to consider how much remodeling inconvenience the rest of the family can handle.
Unless you are ready and able to tackle a major remodel, look for a house or condominium that needs only cosmetic improvements. These include painting, wallpapering and replacing items like flooring, window treatments, bathroom and kitchen fixtures, light fixtures, cabinet and interior door hardware and appliances. Remember that even these simple changes can be costly if you have to make many of them.
Beware of improvements that seem easy enough at first glance buy may turn into major headaches and require a lot of money once you’ve moved in. Remodeled kitchens and bathrooms, changes to the floor plan, room additions and redesigned landscaping are examples of seemingly minor changes that can easily eat away the money you thought you saved by selecting a so-called “bargain priced” home. Of course, you may be perfectly willing to spend whatever money is needed to customize the house to match your tastes and needs.
Make sure major systems in the house are in good working condition. The furnace, air-conditioning and plumbing should be up to date, since repairs can be costly. Your agent can arrange to have a professional inspector determine whether the electrical wiring and any room additions are to code. Local utilities often offer free or low-cost inspections to tell you if the house is energy-efficient.
Look for a house with universally popular selling points. If you’re impressed, the next buyer down the line is bound to be, too. For example, a roomy, modern east-to-clean kitchen is the best selling point a home can have. A house with only one bathroom is less desirable than a house with two or more. Many buyers expect at least three bedrooms, with a master bedroom that offers a feeling of privacy. Lots of storage space and closets, especially walk-in closets, will be a real selling point. Family rooms or “great rooms” also are desirable. On closer examination, a house that looks like a bargain may lack some of these key features.
Don’t forget the old adage: location, location, location. Unless you’re looking for a fixer-upper, the house should be in a condition that is comparable to other homes in the neighborhood. Avoid buying the biggest or fanciest home on the block. Consider the amount of traffic or noise. Homes located in a quiet area away from a busy street will command a higher price. Make sure the schools in your district have a reputation for quality education and safety. Nearby supermarkets, gas stations, restaurants and theaters also will make a location more desirable.
Good community facilities also add appeal; pools, athletic fields, community centers, libraries and hospitals all add to a neighborhood’s value and desirability. Transportation needs also should be considered. Is local public transit available? How long are typical commutes to places of current and potential employment? Are there several alternate route? How close is a major airport? All of these can affect a home’s pricing.
Consider the cost of living in a home. It’s important to consider not only purchase price but the monthly cost of living in a home. Estimate your utility and maintenance costs. For example, will the house need to be painted on a regular basis and will you need to spend money maintaining a swimming pool? Ask your agent about the property tax rate and whether increases are anticipated. Will you have to pay special assessments for a homeowner’s association? Consider the point in the life cycle of major household systems, such as the furnace, air conditioning, roof and kitchen appliances.
You can find a bargain! Your first step should be to seek out a knowledgeable real estate agent with experience in the market areas where you wish to purchase a home. I can help you locate those properties that truly are “bargains” and help find the home that most closely matches your desires and needs.

HOW TO SPOT A GOOD BUY

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, particularly when it comes to buying a home. Features that attract one home-buyer may repel another.
However, the one feature of interest to every home-buyer is price. Getting the most home for your money is paramount. The real problem is figuring out whether that fixer-upper on one street is a better buy than the home in next-to-new condition two blocks away. That’s why knowing what to look for before you buy can save you time, energy and money down the line.
The first step is figuring out what kind of house you need. A good buy is only a good buy if it meets your current and future living requirements. Before shopping for a home, decide how much space you and your family require. How many bedrooms, bathrooms? Is a family room necessary? Do you need a layout that will accommodate a lot of entertaining? Do you prefer a spacious or compact work space in the kitchen? If you have small children, can the house easily be childproofed?
Evaluate the front and back yards. Is there enough space to accommodate your children? Do you want a park-like or garden setting? Do you enjoy yard work and gardening, or do you want a low-maintenance yard? Take into consideration the cost of extensive landscaping and upkeep.
Next, determine how much work is required to make the house you are considering livable. Make an honest assessment of your fix-it abilities. How much work are you willing to do or pay someone else to do? Do you have basic decorating, carpentry and plumbing skills? If you plan to learn as you go, make sure you have accurately determined what you are getting into. Ask an experienced friend, family member or your real estate agent for their opinion, and be sure to consider how much remodeling inconvenience the rest of the family can handle.
Unless you are ready and able to tackle a major remodel, look for a house or condominium that needs only cosmetic improvements. These include painting, wallpapering and replacing items like flooring, window treatments, bathroom and kitchen fixtures, light fixtures, cabinet and interior door hardware and appliances. Remember that even these simple changes can be costly if you have to make many of them.
Beware of improvements that seem easy enough at first glance buy may turn into major headaches and require a lot of money once you’ve moved in. Remodeled kitchens and bathrooms, changes to the floor plan, room additions and redesigned landscaping are examples of seemingly minor changes that can easily eat away the money you thought you saved by selecting a so-called “bargain priced” home. Of course, you may be perfectly willing to spend whatever money is needed to customize the house to match your tastes and needs.
Make sure major systems in the house are in good working condition. The furnace, air-conditioning and plumbing should be up to date, since repairs can be costly. Your agent can arrange to have a professional inspector determine whether the electrical wiring and any room additions are to code. Local utilities often offer free or low-cost inspections to tell you if the house is energy-efficient.
Look for a house with universally popular selling points. If you’re impressed, the next buyer down the line is bound to be, too. For example, a roomy, modern east-to-clean kitchen is the best selling point a home can have. A house with only one bathroom is less desirable than a house with two or more. Many buyers expect at least three bedrooms, with a master bedroom that offers a feeling of privacy. Lots of storage space and closets, especially walk-in closets, will be a real selling point. Family rooms or “great rooms” also are desirable. On closer examination, a house that looks like a bargain may lack some of these key features.
Don’t forget the old adage: location, location, location. Unless you’re looking for a fixer-upper, the house should be in a condition that is comparable to other homes in the neighborhood. Avoid buying the biggest or fanciest home on the block. Consider the amount of traffic or noise. Homes located in a quiet area away from a busy street will command a higher price. Make sure the schools in your district have a reputation for quality education and safety. Nearby supermarkets, gas stations, restaurants and theaters also will make a location more desirable.
Good community facilities also add appeal; pools, athletic fields, community centers, libraries and hospitals all add to a neighborhood’s value and desirability. Transportation needs also should be considered. Is local public transit available? How long are typical commutes to places of current and potential employment? Are there several alternate route? How close is a major airport? All of these can affect a home’s pricing.
Consider the cost of living in a home. It’s important to consider not only purchase price but the monthly cost of living in a home. Estimate your utility and maintenance costs. For example, will the house need to be painted on a regular basis and will you need to spend money maintaining a swimming pool? Ask your agent about the property tax rate and whether increases are anticipated. Will you have to pay special assessments for a homeowner’s association? Consider the point in the life cycle of major household systems, such as the furnace, air conditioning, roof and kitchen appliances.
You can find a bargain! Your first step should be to seek out a knowledgeable real estate agent with experience in the market areas where you wish to purchase a home. I can help you locate those properties that truly are “bargains” and help find the home that most closely matches your desires and needs.

Sunday, February 25, 2007

Thinking of buying a foreclosure?

What you should know about Foreclosures

Buying a Foreclosure property is not for the faint of heart and not recommended for first time home buyers. There are many drawbacks you need to be aware of.

Often times, buyers at foreclosure auctions don’t get the opportunity to inspect the property that they are bidding on. You wont know the condition of the property or if there are major defects.

The buyer might need to evict the occupants who can be the previous owners, a tenant or squatters. This will require the services of an attorney experienced in evicting people.

Occupants rarely leave peacefully and frequently cause as much damage as possible before they are forced to move.

When buying a foreclosure property at auction you generally need an all cash payment or sizeable deposit which can easily deplete your cash on hand needed for repairs or other costs.

If you haven’t purchased a foreclosure before, or are inexperienced, you’ll need to be aware that you are bidding against seasoned professionals who have some advantage over you. It could be advanced knowledge of the property and its current state or simply a stronger financial position which allows them to out-bid others, even if they take an initial loss after purchase.

The upside of buying a foreclosure property is that it is possible to acquire a nice home at a less than market price. Sometimes you can acquire a property that only needs minor cosmetic upgrades in order to turn a profit on sale later (ask us for information on flipping).

There is a better way of buying a foreclosure property and that is to have an agent present an offer directly to the owner before foreclosure takes place. At Team Results, we closely monitor foreclosure and pre-foreclosure activity in Long Beach and surrounding communities in order to do just that.

Homes go into foreclosure for many reasons but, frequently its because of an unforeseen problem like loss of job, divorce, medical emergency, etc. and, the owner can no longer afford their monthly housing payment. These are owners that are in distress and often can’t think clearly or try to ignore the problems they’re facing. An experienced agent knows how to consult these types with sincerity and compassion, while delicately offering solutions that solve their problem by alleviating their financial burden and getting you into ownership by paying less and avoiding the pitfalls of buying at foreclosure auction.

Team Results will work with you to create a buying strategy that puts you into homeownership and saves you money. Just call on us, we’ll be happy to give you all the information you need before you make your buying decision.

Tuesday, February 20, 2007

Funny Mortgage Commercial

In no way, shape, or form, do we support or endorse this company, its affilates, subsidiaries, etc. We DO NOT recomend their products and services. This video is for entertainment purposes only and you should seek out your own experts & professionals to represent you in any transaction.

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Saturday, February 17, 2007

Saturday, February 10, 2007

All about real estate commissions

Every buyer and seller wants to save on commissions paid to a real estate broker. We've had discussions before about when to ask for discounts and negotiating the commission amount. So far we haven't talked about what the commission really is and how it works. That's what we're going to do today. {FYI: for the purpose of this discussion, BROKER and AGENT are used interchangeably}


First off, the usual and customary real estate commission is at or around 6%. Business and investment property can be in the upper 10% area. ALL REAL ESTATE COMMISSIONS ARE NEGOTIABLE BETWEEN THE CLIENT AND BROKER.


Usually the seller pays the commission through sale proceeds at the close of escrow. The great majority of real estate sale transactions involve more than one broker (or agent). The seller's agent takes the listing, lets say at 6%. This agent begins a marketing program and lists the property in the local MLS (multiple listing service).


Another agent (most likely) may bring a client over to see the house and write an offer to purchase. If the seller accepts the offer, the other agent will be paid 3% of the 6% commission when escrow closes. This is called the 'Split'.


As an example, lets assume a sale price of $100,000. At the close of escrow the commission settlement may look something like this:


Sale Price: 100,000 x .06 = 6,000 /2 (split 50/50) = 3,000 to each broker.


This example doesn't account for fees and costs each agent incurs in the course of doing business which easily can eat up 1/3 of the commission paid on each transaction. So the take-home pay for agents in our example might only be $2000 and since they are usually self-employed; at least 30% of that will get set aside for taxes. Leaving 1,400 to pay the rent and keep the lights on.



So that is what the commission is. It's a fee for a service and that fee gets split between the service providers. Again, the commission is always negotiable and your transaction may have higher or lower amounts than our example. Every transaction is different and the workload for each transaction is different also.

For tips on negotiating the commission on your purchase or sale, e-mail John.Wall1@Century21.com or Call (562) 449-8421. I'd be happy to help.

Sunday, January 21, 2007

Important Information for Seniors in LA County



Senior Citizens in Los Angeles County have an important tax saving benefit available to them should the need to move arize.




With Propositions 60 & 90 in Los Angeles and other participating Counties, Seniors can transfer their principal residence's tax base to a newly acquired home of equal or lesser value. In some cases, that "equal or lesser" value might be up to 110% of their principal residence; which means a senior could actually buy-up and keep their existing low tax base.




There are rules to be followed in order to receive the most benefit from this program and interested home-seller's should visit the Los Angeles County Assessor's website for more information. www.lacountyassessor.com.




Just in case you were wondering, the newly acquired property doesn't necessarily need to be in LA County as long as the new county is a participating member of prop 60&90.




For a free brochure covering the benefits available under prop 60 & 90; qualifying information and claims information, please send an e-mail to John.Wall1@century21.com and request Prop 60/90 info. The brochures are available in PDF format via e-mail, or we'll mail you a copy free of charge. Be sure to include your preferred contact information.




Taxes are one thing you can count on always being there. TeamResults is committed to serving our client's and educating the buying and selling public on the best ways to save on everything from commissions to taxes. Please let us know if you have any questions that we might answer, TeamResults@century21.com.


Tuesday, January 16, 2007

Median Sales Price LA County






Los Angeles County – The median sales price for single family homes rose 6.5% since this time last year. Even with a 12.9% drop in sales, prices have remained strong and continued to climb. Homes may sit a little longer on the market, but, there is no longer a rush on housing.

The market is correcting itself (as any free-market should) after a steady climb for the past couple of years. Although, many realtors and professional real estate players are calling this market a “buyer’s market”, many buyers disagree. According to the Los Angeles Times today, Mr. Brandon Brennan has been trying to purchase a home by making [buyer’s market] offers only to be rebuffed by seller’s who can’t even be bothered to counter-offer.

Home-sellers know that offers will come in and someone will come along with a fair market value offer. That is the offer that sellers are holding out for. Brennan finally closed on a home, eventually paying more than he had hoped, but less than the original asking price, and only beating other offers by offering to close the deal within 2 weeks.
So for seller’s I guess, I’d say it’s a seller’s market and to buyer’s I would say it’s a buyer’s market. For a market analysis of your home please give me a call at 562-433-1914 or e-mail john.wall1@century21.com. Buyer’s too – for a complete Buyer Potential Report use the same e-mail link.